Honor


Starting Honor

All characters start with an Honor ability score of 11. (This score is not modified by the point-buy system.) A character with a lawful or chaotic alignment adds or subtracts 2, respectively. A character with a good or evil alignment adds or subtracts 1, respectively.

Honor Chart

Following is a general translation of the Honor score into practical terms.

Honor Score Description
1-4 Honorless. This character does not adhere to the principles of bushido, and even mocks them as irrelevant ideas. Such a character cannot be trusted, for betrayal comes as naturally to this person as breathing.
5-8 Untrustworthy. The code of bushido is an inconvenience to this character, a tool best used to manipulate others. Such a person would betray anyone in the right circumstances, but can usually be relied on at least to come to the aid of family members or close friends.
9-12 Honorable in Deeds. At a bare minimum, an honorable character must act in accordance with bushido, even if the character’s heart is not in it. Subordinating one’s own interest to those of the family is difficult for such a character, and living up to the ideals of bushido is a constant struggle. With each successful bout against temptation, however, the character’s resolve grows stronger.
13-16 Honorable in Thoughts. A truly honorable character no longer doubts or questions bushido and its demands. Such a person, while not free from temptation, easily overcomes it. Now, the difficulty comes when the character is forced to bend rules, however slightly—this is a challenge for the exceptionally honorable.
17-20 Honorable in Soul. The paragon of honor cannot be swayed from the call of duty to family and noble house. To even question the honor of such a character is unthinkable. Characters so immersed in honor are selfless, completely devoted to family and close friends, and willing to give up their own lives for the safety and security of others.

Honor Effects

In addition to modifying Honor checks and Honor saving throws, one’s Honor score provides certain additional game effects.

A person who is honorless has a terrible reputation. Anyone with an Honor score of 13 or higher who would normally be indifferent to this character, instead starts as hostile. Anyone with an Honor score of 9 or higher who would normally be friendly to this character, instead starts as indiferent.

A person who is untrustworthy has a bad reputation. Anyone with an Honor score of 17 or higher who would normally be indifferent to this character, instead starts as hostile. Anyone with an Honor score of 13 or higher who would normally be friendly to this character, instead starts as indiferent.

A person who is honorable in deeds has a passable reputation. Anyone with an Honor score of 17 or higher who would normally be indifferent to this character, instead starts as friendly.

A person who is honorable in thoughts has a good reputation. Anyone with an honor score of 17 or higher who would normally be hostile to this character, instead starts as indifferent. Anyone with an Honor score of 13 or higher who would normally be indifferent to this character, instead starts as friendly.

A person honorable in soul has an excellent reputation. Anyone with an Honor score of 13 or higher who would normally be hostile to this character, instead starts as indifferent. Anyone with an Honor score of 9 or higher who would normally be indifferent to this character, instead starts as friendly. One who is honorable in soul has advantage on saving throws to resist coersion, even magical, into an act that would bring dishonor to the character.

Honor and Dishonor Examples

Honorable actions, according to the code of bushido, include:

- Avenging the death of a family member
- Defeating an ancestral enemy
- Saving another person’s life
- Leading a victorious force in battle
- Completing a great quest
- Dying a heroic death

Dishonorable actions include the following:

- Being accused or convicted of a crime
- Being taken prisoner
- Breaking an oath
- Losing a birthright, including an ancestral weapon
- Losing a contest or duel, especially to an inferior opponent
- Behaving rashly or improperly
- Refusing a contest or duel
- Committing treason
- Entering into debt (of money or favors)
- Fleeing a fight
- Leading a losing force in battle
- Using a peasant weapon
- Disobeying a military or political superior

Honor

The Dead Wars Randy Randy